Weird Beer Snacks

Weird Beer Snacks

It would not be a mistake to say that beer one of the most beloved drinks around the world. There are so many kinds and variations of it, but you will never have regrets or disappointment after ordering a nice glass of refreshing, bubbly, and cold beer on a hot summer day. However, you can be highly shocked, disguised, and disappointed after ordering some snacks to accompany your beer. People are used to be eating extremely weird and unusual stuff, but keep in mind that some unusual things might be crazy delicious.

Meat Stuff

The first snack is pork scratching and it might be a familiar thing to you because it is very British. These are deep-fried, salted, crunchy pieces of pork rind with a thick crispy layer of left fat. The snack is eaten cold, the pieces are hard and small, usually, they are served alone without any dips or souses. Another well-known option is beef jerky. It is lean trimmed meat that has been cut into strips and dried. The original version is salted meat, but the variations can be prepared with a seasoned spice rub, liquid, or slowly smoked at a low heat.

Sea Food

Fish is a common beer snack in Russia. There is an endless list of variations, but the most popular option is called “vobla”. This is a dried and highly salted freshwater fish. The traditional way of preparation is like beef jerky. Some small sandwiches made of black bread, butter, raw herring, and fresh onions are top beer snack in the Netherlands.

Sea Food

Sea Food

Japanese like to eat dried, salty, chewy, shredded squid with a glass of beer. The traditional way of preparation takes a few weeks and knowledge, but now it is possible to buy these squids at supermarkets. Another shocking beer snack in Japan is candied crabs. The small crabs are deep-fried with their shells and covered in sugar or even caramelized. Sounds very weirds but they taste good with beer. The snack called “otsumami” is common in South Korea. This is cooked, seasoned, salted, dried, cured, and shredded cuttlefish that can be eaten alone or with some traditional oily sauce. The consistency is like Japanese dried squid, but this cuttlefish goes surprisingly well with light beer.

Chips

This option sounds like a safe and familiar one. However, there are millions of different chips around the world. For example, you can order “bamba” in Israel. These crispy sticks are made of peanut butter with a little hint of salt, and they stick to the teeth when you try to chew them. Shrimp chips are common in Malaysia and Taiwan. These chips can be made of shrimps, lobsters, crabs, and other seashells, as well as, they can be flavored with different herbs.

If talking about the traditional chips made of potatoes, then keep in mind that in Scotland you can find potato chips that taste like haggis. It is recommended to try the lamb and mint potato chips in New Zealand. The octopus-flavored potato chips are trendy snack in South Korea.